Posts Tagged ‘Elections’

Editor’s NOTE: The following op-ed, penned by me, was originally published in The Nation on August 8, 2015. I’m pleased to cross-post the article on my blog from The Nation without any editing. (Ali Salman Alvi)

PTIPakistan Tehreek Insaf parliamentarians have made their way back to Parliament after facing stiff resistance from Maulana Fazlur Rehman-led faction of the JUI and the Mutahidda Qaumi Movement after PTI’s claim, that General Elections 2013 had been systematically rigged and manipulated to rob the party of power, were put to rest by an inquiry commission headed by Chief Justice Nasir ul Mulk. Imran Khan and his party strongly believed that their mandate was stolen by the PML-N & Co and thus they were deprived a chance to come to power. Rejecting election results have been a familiar trend in Pakistan’s political arena since 1970. The parties which lose elections come up with rigging allegations and refuse to accept the results. Against the alleged rigging in the 2013 general elections, the PTI organised a long march last year which left Lahore on August 14 and reached the capital on August 16. The long march was followed by a sit-in which lasted over 126 days. The sit-in was called off when a group of terrorists attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar which left 150 dead including 132 schoolchildren.

During a year old campaign Imran Khan vehemently accused former Chief Justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Chaudhry, former caretaker CM Punjab Najam Sethi, the PML-N, the ECP and returning officers of hatching a conspiracy to bring Nawaz Sharif to power by manipulating the mandate given by the people of Pakistan. However, Imran Khan lost his case before a panel comprising of three judges of the apex court which was formed to probe General Elections 2013 against rigging allegations as an indirect result of an agreement between the PML-N and the PTI.

In one of his interviews Imran Khan alleged that a brigadier of Military Intelligence was among those who rigged the general election against the PTI. When Mr Khan was asked to name that officer, he said that he will name him in his next public speech. His followers kept on waiting for the announcement of the MI’s brigadier’s name, but that never happened. The former captain hopped to other targets instead of naming the army officer. Notwithstanding repetitive demands from different quarters, Imran Khan neither named that army officer nor he dared to reiterate that claim ever again.

BBThe 1990 general elections are the only polls in Pakistan’s electoral history which were proven to have been systematically rigged and engineered according to the verdict issued by the Supreme Court of Pakistan in the Asghar Khan case. Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto was the victim as ISI robbed her of power by bankrolling a group of politicians. It was proven that the military establishment created and funded a coalition known as the Islami Jamhoori Ittehad (IJI) whose sole purpose was to prevent Benazir Bhutto’s PPP from winning the 1990 elections. In its short order issued on Oct 19, 2012, the apex court directed the federal government to take appropriate action under the Constitution and the law against former army chief Gen (r) Aslam Beg and former DG ISI Lt-Gen (r) Asad Durrani for their role in facilitating a group of politicians to ensure their success against the PPP in the 1990 elections. Aside from that, another former DG ISI, Lt-Gen (r) Hameed Gul openly accepted responsibility for creating IJI in an interview with renowned anchorperson Asma Shirazi back in October 2012. In his interview, Hamid Gul not only defended the creation of the IJI, but also lauded General (r) Aslam Beg’s role in creating it. In the 141-page detailed verdict authored by the then Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, the Supreme Court held that unlawful orders by superior military officers or their failure to prevent unlawful actions by their subordinates were reprehensible.

The verdict also explained why the apex court had ruled that the 1990 general elections were polluted by the dishing out of millions of rupees to a particular group of politicians just to deprive the people of being represented by the representatives elected by them. The verdict also highlighted details and names of the recipients of the money dished out by the ISI as mentioned by the then DG ISI Lt-Gen (r) Asad Durrani in his affidavit filed on July 24, 1994 and the majority of my readers would know that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s name is among them. Not only that, he benefited the most from the 1990 general elections, polluted by the military establishment, and went on to become the prime minister of the country.

Nawaz Sharif led the IJI

Nawaz Sharif led the IJI

In the name of ‘reconciliation’ the then PPP government shied away from honouring the verdict. Free and fair elections in Pakistan will remain a distant dream as long as the culprits pointed out by the Supreme Court of Pakistan are not taken to task. The politics of reconciliation has reduced the PPP to interior Sindh only and if the party doesn’t mend its ways, it may lose its fort to the policy of reconciliation being followed by the party. The key to free and fair elections in Pakistan lies in the verdict given by the apex court in the Asghar Khan case and not in the report issued by the inquiry commission headed by Chief Justice Nasir ul Mulk. If the political parties in general and PTI and PPP in particular are sincere with democracy and wish to see free and fair elections in future, they should go to the apex court to get the verdict implemented in letter and spirit the court has issued almost three years ago. Because the same verdict says that “In upholding people’s right, this court can make all necessary directions to functionaries and institutions of the state, including the Election Commission of Pakistan, and the direction to investigate and prosecute.”

The onus is on the PTI and the PPP to pave the way for free and fair elections in 2018. If they don’t act now in the right direction, it’ll be the ruling PML-N that will make the most out of their inaction, flawed policies and ill-directed strategies. And in that case it’ll be a matter of surprise to none; if the PML-N comes to power again after the next general elections.

Source: Elections and rigging

Editor’s NOTE: The following op-ed, penned by me, was originally published in The Nation on September 9, 2014. I’m pleased to cross-post the article on my blog from The Nation without any editing. (Ali Salman Alvi)

Arguably, democracy was the most successful political idea of the last century. In the lexical definition, democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are meant to participate equally – either directly or, through elected representatives, indirectly. The representatives develop and establish laws by which their society is run. Democracy is still willfully misinterpreted and misused in Pakistan. Oligarchic governments and dictatorial regimes alike have attempted to seek popular support by calling themselves democratic.

The protesters led by Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) Chairman Imran Khan and Pakistan Awami Tehreek (PAT) Chief Dr Tahirul Qadri, who have overturned the politics of Pakistan for the past two weeks or so, have many ambitions for their homeland. Their demands call for electoral reforms, free and fair elections, social justice, a rules-based democracy, implementation of constitutional clauses relating to rights of people, and the establishment of a clean government to replace the kleptocracy of Prime Minister Mian Nawaz Sharif. On the other hand, barring the PTI parliamentarians who have announced to resign from National Assembly and three provincial assemblies amid a bitter row with the government over alleged election rigging, parliament has thrown its weight behind the government led by the PML-N at an emergency session of the bicameral house where parliamentarians from both sides of the political divide lent their unequivocal support to democracy and re-pledged their allegiance to the Constitution of the country.

 

PAT supporters

PAT supporters

The prevailing electoral process is faulty to the core and it shall not evolve even after the next 20 general elections if not reformed. Without an iota of a doubt, the polling process should be rigging-free, transparent and fair but there is another aspect of the electoral process that needs immediate attention of all those political parties, which believe in true democracy. The filter that should prevent the candidates having a criminal record from contesting polls is missing from the process. Consequently in a country like ours, where democracy is still at a rather nascent stage, such candidates reach the corridors of power, to protect and secure their vested interests.

As a matter of fact at least 55 candidates from the Punjab only, belonging to 10 different sectarian groups, were allowed to contest the May 11 polls despite the fact that intelligence agencies had warned the ECP that they were on terrorist lists. 40 of these 55 candidates, who were allowed to run for parliamentary elections, belonged to the outlawed Sipah-e-Sahaba which had already been renamed as Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat. The ASWJ chief Ahmed Ludhianvi, Aurangzeb Farooqi and Ch Abid Raza Gujjar, are to name a few who were allowed to contest polls despite their involvement in terrorist activities. While the first two contested elections along with over 130 candidates from the MDM platform, standing on a nakedly sectarian manifesto, the latter had a PML-N ticket to run for a National Assembly seat from Gujrat. The MDM alliance aimed for the establishment of the true Islamic system of caliphate in Pakistan, as per its chairman Sami ul Haq, which was in absolute contradiction with the constitution of Pakistan. Yet the MDM candidates were allowed to contest polls even though the ECP had strictly prohibited candidates from using religion, ethnicity, caste or gender to seek votes. In addition to that the ECP had issued a warning of a three-year jail term for any candidate found using such means in the campaign. But strangely enough, no such proscription or jail term was recommended in the ECP’s Code of Conduct for those running their campaign on religious, sectarian grounds. Needless to mention that Ahmed Ludhianvi made his way to parliament on the back of an absurd verdict by an election tribunal of the Lahore High Court, which was later suspended by the Supreme Court of Pakistan.

Chaudhry Abid Raza Gujjar, who is now a PML-N MNA from NA – 107 Gujrat, had been handed down death penalty under section 302 and section 7 of the Anti Terrorism Act 1997 for the murder of six people during a failed assassination attempt on his political rival. His nomination papers for the May 11 elections were rejected by Returning Officer Malik Ali Zulqarnain Awan after an independent candidate challenged his eligibility to run in the elections on the murder charge as well as Mr. Gujjar’s alleged connections with banned terrorist outfits, including the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi and Sipah-e-Sahaba. Gujjar was also listed on the 4th Schedule of Anti-Terrorism Act 1997 for his alleged involvement in terrorism-related activities. However quite absurdly, he was later cleared by an election tribunal of the Lahore High Court after he submitted an affidavit to the tribunal stating that he would refrain from engaging in terrorist activities in future.

Among many others PML-N MPA Rana Shoiab Idress, who was caught on tape attacking a police station in Faisalabad, is another grim illustration of the plight of democracy in our country. Mr. Idrees and his accomplices attacked the Khurarianwala police station and freed Rana Zulfiqar and three other prisoners charged in a murder case. The bottom-line is that the filter that should prevent such criminals, law offenders and tax defaulters from contesting polls is missing and needs to be placed firmly in the electoral process. Democracy in Pakistan needs to be supported by each and every one of us so that it may deliver a government of the people, for the people, by the people and not a government of the elite, by the elite, for the elite. Otherwise the people would lose their faith and trust over democracy.

PTI supporters

PTI supporters

It is a good omen that all political parties in parliament have a consensus on introducing electoral reforms. For this purpose PTI leadership has to sit with other opposition parties in parliament to prepare a new draft law take it to parliament and put the ball in the PML-N’s court. Pakistan People’s Party has rendered great sacrifices for democracy in Pakistan. The party, founded by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, has braved two military dictators including the tyrannical rule of General Zia-ul Haq. Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto and then Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto laid their lives for a democratic Pakistan. The PPP has endorsed the allegations of the PTI about massive rigging in the May 11 elections on the floor of the house. The onus is on the PPP, which is leading opposition parties in parliament, PTI, ANP, MQM and all other political parties to come up with a political solution, under the purview of the constitution of Pakistan, to the current political stalemate. Otherwise another military intervention would result in grave consequences. Only time will tell whether the PML-N government act maturely and strengthen democracy or it will meet the same fate it did in 1997.

Source: Democratic Terror